Telling Your Story - A Communications Guide for School Boards

TELLING YOUR STORY - A Communications Guide for School Boards

Telling Your Story is a 28-page communications guide for school board members. In seven easy-to-read chapters, complete with discussion points, the book tells how school boards can better communicate and engage with various constituencies, set the record straight about their work, build a network of supporters, work with the district's communications department, and develop an "elevator speech." Note: State School Boards Associations may purchase the print book for half price, or download the PDF for free in the State Associations Members Only area of the web site.

Introduction

School board members have one mission: to provide the best education possible for all children. You do this by making decisions that affect every important aspect of our K-12 public education system, governing a $432 billion industry for a pittance.

And yet, negative messages about school boards and public education abound in the media, which tends to cover stories of board dysfunction or controversy or frame public schools as “failing.” That’s because we’ve let others tell our story and define the agenda for public education.

This toolkit does not attempt to give you everything you need for a solid communications program. It is designed to spur conversations by your board and district administrators about ways to tell the story of school board leadership and public education. Better public support for public schools is possible, but it requires courageous leadership and a strategic approach that views communications as a never-ending campaign.

It is time to tell your story.


 

Additional Resources

Purchase Online: Telling Your Story - A Communications Guide for School Board Members
Telling Your Story is a 28-page communications guide for school board members. In seven easy-to-read chapters, complete with discussion points, the book tells how school boards can better communicate and engage with various constituencies, set the record straight about their work, build a network of supporters, work with the district's communications department, and develop an "elevator speech."

 
 
Connect With NSBA